Riverside Metropolitan Museum

Reading the Walls Online Exhibit - Room #2 : Case 2

Haradas in Riverside

<p>Manuscript draft written by Jukichi Harada to the Veterans administration,
Washington, DC July 25, 1939. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada Family 
Collection.</p>

<p>Jukichi would continue in his quest to obtain United States citizenship. In 
the 1930s a new law was pending that would grant citizenship and veteran’s 
benefits to alien war veterans. He worked with his new son-in-law, Saburo Kido, 
to document his service and hernia injury in the Spanish American War. However, 
the resulting 1935 law was only for aliens who had served in World War I.</p>

<p>Jukichi’s reasons as to why he did not report his injury at the time 
resonates with many immigrants: "I never tell anybody reason why I am afraid 
sure I loos [sic] job Deportation sure by Immigration Law My wife and boy coming 
from Japan/what shall I do as our Promise I want die here Deporting all 
together/ I cannot [?] back die here deporting all together."</p>
<p>Photograph, Harold Harada, 1930. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada Family
Collection.</p>

<p>This photograph was taken of Harold Harada age 6 on the steps of the 
Riverside Municipal Auditorium. Behind the photograph was a typed list of all 
the books he read in first grade.</p>
<p>Photograph, Harold Harada, 1930. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada Family
Collection.</p>

<p>Behind the photograph of Harold Harada taken at age 6 was this typed list of all 
the books he read in first grade.</p>
<p>Photograph, Wedding Portrait of Mine Harada and Saburo Kido, 1928. Riverside
Metropolitan Museum, Harada Family Collection.</p>

<p>Mine graduated Riverside Polytechnic High School in 1923 and went on to 
Riverside Junior College. In 1926, she moved to San Francisco. There Masa Atsu 
introduced her to her future husband, Saburo Kido. Kido had grown up in Hawaii 
and was a graduate of Hastings College of Law. They were married on May 29, 1928 
and Frank Miller presented the couple with a set of punch glasses. The Kidos 
joined other Nisei (second generation Japanese) activists in the area to 
establish the Japanese American Citizens League in 1928 with Saburo acting as 
the organization’s first president.</p>
<p>Photograph, Harada Family Portrait, 1928. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada
Family Collection.</p>

<p>Taken at the time of Mine Harada's marriage to Saburo Kido, this was the last full family photograph of the Harada family in Riverside. 
Rear, left to right, Mine, Mary (Mrs. Masa Atsu Harada), Masa Atsu and son, 
Calvin, Sumi, and Clark; front, left to right, Yoshizo, Ken, Harold and Jukichi.</p>
<p>Certificate, United States Army, Reserve Officers Training Corps, Clark Harada, June 6, 1938. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada 
Family Collection.</p>

<p>All four of the Harada sons, Masa Atsu, Yoshizo, Clark, Harold, and Roy 
participated in their schools ROTC.  </p>
<p>Photograph, Yoshizo in ROTC Uniform. Riverside Metropolitan Museum, Harada 
Family Collection.</p>

<p>All four of the Harada sons, Masa Atsu, Yoshizo, Clark, Harold, and Roy 
participated in their schools ROTC.  </p>
Mouse over and click items for additional details.Click here to return to Room 2

The Haradas now concentrated on raising their family and striving towards those other fundamental components of the American dream– a steady income, education, and professional careers for their children. In the predominately white Lemon Street neighborhood, the Haradas did have some concerns about the response of their neighbors.

The Harada family grew with the birth of Harold Shigetaka in 1923. In 1929, Jukichi adopted nine-year old Roy Hashimura whose parents had died. Jukichi and Ken Harada and their children were active and respected participants in the Riverside community. All the Harada children attended local schools and graduated from Riverside Polytechnic High School. Their proud parents kept schoolwork, yearbooks, and other memorabilia documenting their children’s accomplishments. Jukichi was president of the Japanese Association, created the Japanese calligraphy for headstone inscriptions at Olivewood Cemetery and served as a courtroom interpreter. He continued his quest for American citizenship when a new law was pending granting citizenship to alien war veterans.

The last time that all the Harada family members would be in Riverside was the occasion of Mine’s marriage to Saburo Kido in 1928. By 1941, the older children had moved away from Riverside. Only Sumi and Harold remained. Ken had suffered several strokes and Jukichi stayed home as her caregiver. Sumi became the primary operator of the "Washington Restaurant." Harold, still in his teens, assisted Sumi while he attended Junior College.

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